People often talk about “organisational culture” like it’s a silver bullet. Get the culture right in a workplace and, before you know it, you’ll be breaking sales records and winning awards, right?

Wrong.

Many organisations are investing huge money and effort into getting their company culture just right.

It’s a fantastic objective, but one that’s potentially flawed when organisational culture is viewed as a homogenous mass.

So here are a few insider tips to consider when looking at your organisation’s culture. Take these tips into account and you’ll ensure you get value from your review.

Tip 1: Organisations aren’t limited to one culture

This is a common misconception, but there are many cultural aspects that create both your clients’ and staff’s reality. Often, numerous organisational cultures are competing for attention. While your culture relates to your team and staff processes, it’s also expressed through customer experience.  Motivational speaker Simon Sinek cites Starbucks as an example, saying “Starbucks was founded around the experience and the environment of their stores.” He says the brand created a comfortable space for people to come and work without pressure to buy. “The coffee was incidental,” he continues.

Takeaway: Remember that while culture is often seen as relating to your internal team, how you’re perceived in the marketplace by your customers, as well as the wider community, is another measure of your organisational culture.

Tip 2: A culture of loyalty can be damaging

I want to debunk a long-held view that staff loyalty is always essential to a positive organisational culture. I’ve worked with dozens of companies and organisations who have proven that loyalty – often viewed based on length of service – can be counterproductive. At times employees can become so “loyal” to an employer that they don’t make their own future and wellbeing a priority, with disastrous consequences. Loyal employees can feel disengaged if they’re overlooked for promotions, while employers might conversely place too high of a regard on loyalty, rather than finding the best person for a particular role. Loyal employees can stop employers from making the hard decisions they need to. At the same time, employees might miss out on the opportunities they want, resulting in a lose-lose.

Takeaway: Modern businesses need to create a culture that places respect for each other and our clients, hard work and genuine output ahead of loyalty.

Tip 3: Review your culture – regularly

Think you’ve already got a great organisational culture? It’s still important to review your cultures, as your internal culture influences how your customers perceive you and your organisation, and impacts on the quality of your service delivery. This, in turn, will impact your KPIs and the overall performance of your organisation. Steve Jobs once famously stated that the real return on culture at Apple “happened when we started getting more deliberate about it”. He said this was done “By writing it down. By debating it. By taking it apart, polishing the pieces and putting it back together.”

Takeaway: Your organisation’s cultures are always a work in progress, open to review, change and growth.

Need support reviewing your organisational cultures? Kiikstart can help. Get in touch at enquiries@kiikstart.com or phone 0428 593 400.

Opening her eyes to “new possibilities” for two iconic Outback hotels saw General Manager Jo Fort engage Kiikstart last year.

What’s followed is a “quiet little revolution” at both The Birdsville Hotel and The Innamincka Hotel that began with an idea for a business makeover and evolved into staff development work involving all staff.

Located in Outback Queensland and South Australia respectively, Kiikstart’s Virtual Scholar program has enabled staff to undertake remote training with our director, Ali Uren.

General Manager Jo Fort explains the shift.

Kiikstart: What services have you engaged through Kiikstart?
Jo: I had heard of Ali prior to meeting her at the 2017 SATIC Conference. It was generally agreed that the Kiikstart approach was refreshing, and that she was potentially a consultant who could assist us with staff development and improving customer service, particularly at point of sale.

Why did you engage Ali and how has she helped the Birdsville and Innamincka Hotels?
Jo: When I met Ali I had a vision of empowering management to think like entrepreneurs – that way I imagined I could step back from my already overloaded role. I knew that work needed to start at General Manager level first.

What changes have been made and what changes are underway for your businesses?
I can honestly say there has been a quiet little revolution that has resulted in a makeover in what we do and the way we present to our guests. Ali has helped our businesses by assisting us to deal with the tricky issues, and helping our team to come up with ways to do the job better. Choosing to live and work in the Outback can place people well out of their comfort zone and, while it may seem exciting, it’s like any job; it can be mundane and repetitive. Living close together and having to work on relationships at work, as well as outside of work, is challenging.

She’s encouraged us to think imaginatively, to be creative, and to question work practices. If the actions don’t fit with our values and vision, then they have no place in our life.

How has Ali helped to streamline the change process?
The development process is streamlined to suit individuals. Ali is persuasive, but she also understands that some concepts take time, and that from little ideas, big things grow. As a group we are excited, inspired, encouraged and motivated to stand out from our competitors and to be notably excellent in general.

Ali guided me in the early phase of our plan to get myself and then our team to think outside the box. Once I was happy that the foundations of the business were strong under her guidance, the business strategy, roles and responsibilities were fleshed out.

How would you describe Ali’s coaching style?
Ali is a tenacious, tireless trainer who works from her heart. She is 100% authentic and what you see is what you get. She is as terrifying as she is inspirational! I have used the word ‘terrifying’ because it’s the only word I can think of when your tasks aren’t done and you have a session booked with Ali. She is not up for ‘the dog ate my homework’! Ali believes in what she says, and she has the experience and background to back up her teaching. I understood from the beginning that it was my role in my learnings with Ali to set aside the time to do the work and set the tone.

To what extent have you relied on technology throughout this process?
Heavily! Technology has enabled us to learn with Ali through the Virtual Scholar program. That’s been the great strength in the way we’ve done things. Simply parachuting in to learn in one hour will not grant the paradigm shift we’re now seeing unfold. We have the technology, so we use it!

How valuable do you think your investment to date has been?
I believe I have invested wisely in engaging Ali. Not only is she a fantastic resource, but she has become a friend, and I look forward to continuing our journey. Sure, it’s a business decision to invest in staff development, but already there are outcomes and a level of maturity on-site that was not seen before. We are thinking before we act, and we are empowered and confident as a group.

To find out more about coaching options for your business, including our remote Virtual Scholar offering, get in touch with Ali at
enquiries@kiikstart.com or phone 0428 593 400.

There’s that natural sense of trepidation that comes with taking the plunge into business.

Unlike a cold dip, it can take quite some time before you come up for air. And, sometimes, longer still to feel like you’re not just treading water.

But as LA-based investor and entrepreneur Lauris Liberts says, “Don’t wait for the right moment to start the business. It never arrives. Start whenever. Now.”

While there’s a lot you can only learn through experiencing the inherent highs and lows of business firsthand, there are also many tips and resources you can draw upon throughout your business journey.

At Kiikstart I work with businesses ranging from start-ups to large corporations, supporting the development of their business strategy, tactics, skills, and capacity building functions.

Here, I’ve offered a few of my top tips for getting started. If you’re not a business novice, chances are these tips are a good refresher anyway!

Be Genuine
Of all of the tips I can offer, perhaps the most important is to genuinely believe in your product or service. Entrepreneur and philanthropist Maria Forleo advises, “Never start a business just to ‘make money’. Start a business to make a difference.” This comes down to knowing your why. Ask: how will my product or service enrich people’s lives? Your business is much more likely to succeed if you know your ‘why’ and have the passion to keep at it through tough times. Only a genuine belief in your offering will allow this.

Know Your Worth
Do your homework before starting out. How is your business of real value to people? Does it fulfil a gap in the market? Or are you doing things a little differently? Never start a business because someone else told you that you would be good at something. This is a disaster. To be able to make any business work you need to be able to quickly articulate why someone should spend money with you. This is not for the faint hearted or overtly humble! Know your worth, and be ready to spruik it!

Mind the Gap(s)
We all have personal strengths, as well as weaknesses and skill gaps. Get real about your skill gaps – and find solutions to these. Play to your strengths, and assess whether further learning is needed, or whether you’re better off having an employee or contractor do some of this work for you. It’s all about weighing up risks and opportunities. Over the past 12 years I’ve mentored 1700 people to lifelong change, including career change. When people say they want to undertake further study, I always ask how it will benefit them and their business. What changes will it make? And if they don’t do it, what is the outcome?

Choose Your Partners Wisely
Choose your partners carefully in business – and in life! There will be times when you need to lean heavily on your partner, so make sure you have someone who can be there for you when times get tough. Also be careful about who you partner with in business. Ensure this is a person you can trust completely, and that you have complementary skills to bring to the table. As Emma Jones, founder of Enterprise Nation, says, “Choose a business partner as carefully as you would choose a spouse.”

Master Your Time
A business isn’t a 9-5 job, so being disciplined with your time – and how you let other people use it – is essential. Starting a new business requires the ability to consistently set and meet deadlines, even if that means saying “no” to the demands and expectations of other people. Remember that for every client-facing hour, there will be just as many hours of work required behind the scenes looking at your business’ strategy, communications, financial management, administration and more.

Take Care
Self-care is a crucial element to long-term business success. So get your physical and mental well-being in order, and make a commitment to yourself. If this means working with a personal trainer and psychologist, then do it. Starting a business and pushing the limits will be the most enjoyable and stressful venture you can undertake. If you are not well in every sense of the word you, will not give yourself the best possible chance of success.

Stay Accountable
Ensure you are accountable to someone outside of your family and friends. Whether this person takes the form of a mentor, business coach, or comes via a formal business program, it’s vital you verbalise your plans and ideas to this trusted source. Choose someone with great business instincts and vision who will also call it as they see it.

Need an accountability partner? Kiikstart offers a Virtual Scholar mentoring program suited to both start-ups and established businesses throughout Australia. During the program, I’ll work with you either in-person or via technology to develop your business – and yourself. Working in partnership with you, we co-create your learning experience so our focus is on what’s most useful to you. Sessions are an hour at a time, and designed to fit in with your life, including over the weekends if need be. If you’re looking for an accountability partner in business, Kiikstart could be it!

Contact 0428 593 400 or email enquiries@kiikstart.com.

Courage. Look at most of the world’s successful business leaders and courage is a fitting word to describe their approach to business.

From Sir Richard Branson, to Warren Buffett, Elon Musk and Anita Roddick, entrepreneurs take calculated risks to achieve results.

They’re dreamers and hustlers who prove that business as usual just won’t do.

In a global marketplace, it’s clear a ‘business as usual’ approach gets you nowhere. Today, business means being brave, challenging your thinking, consistently questioning whether you’re giving the market what it wants, and seeing risks as opportunities.

Here, I’ve outlined five simple tactics for combatting business as usual. So be brave and buckle up, because the life of an entrepreneur is one hell of a ride!

1. Continuous improvement

Undoubtedly a buzz term, when continuous improvement is done right, it’s a sure-fire antidote to business as usual. In a nutshell, continuous improvement is ongoing effort to improve all aspects of your business, from its productivity to its processes and people. Self-reflection is an important part of this. Seek input from your team, and think about what you’ve delivered to the market in the past 12 months, and how.

Why? Remaining relevant, responding to customers’ needs and leveraging new opportunities ensures you’ll continue to provide what your customers want.

2. Dispose of waste

Yes, minimising waste is key to business success, but I’m also referring to missed opportunities, under or over-servicing, duplication of services, errors in service transactions, and delays when working with external providers. One of the greatest sources of waste? How people use their time, and wasting energy pursuing “opportunities” that don’t eventuate. All of these scenarios impact your business’ efficiency. Consider the greatest area of waste in your business and its impact on your customer’s experience. Start small – address how you can minimise waste in this area of your business, and build from there.

Why? Waste not only impacts your business’ bottom line, but can also be a source of frustration to your team. Turn this around and show you care to your employees and your customers.

3. Innovate or perish

Innovation is defined as “the implementation of a new or significantly improved product (good or service), process, new marketing method or a new organisational method in business practices, workplace organisation or external relations”. Innovation means doing something significantly different, which could take the form of a small or large change. Kiikstart recently worked with a national financial services firm to re-invent how they presented figures to clients so this information was more creative, interactive and led to more regular contact and increased revenue. The purpose behind this new visitor servicing model was to meet the challenges and opportunities of the ”new world”, where the next generation of leaders and business decision makers wanted a more exciting approach to facts and figures. Not only is the new model more visually stimulating, but it also creates opportunities to take financial figures and build real business capability that improves all aspects of business – not just the bottom line. It is user-friendly and creative, but most importantly, simplified and practical.

Why? Businesses that fail to innovate perish. Luxury handbag retailer Oroton went into voluntary administration late last year. The brands failure to innovate is one of the major reasons for falling sales. The brand failed to respond to the rise of “accessible luxury” brands, such as The Daily Edited and Mimco. The brand was sitting in no man’s land in terms of brand and offering, lacking the edginess to attract a younger market – and with nothing to drive back the customers who were already familiar with the brand.

4. Broaden your definition of innovation

Yes, innovation might look like sending a Tesla Roadster into space if you’re Elon Musk, but we should extend beyond technological innovation. It might relate to your style of communication and the way your messaging evolves over time. It could be about giving customers greater choice in how your product or service can be accessed. It might relate to price points, your hours of operating and how the product or service is packaged. Or it could relate to a partnership or a product offering or event that your customers would value as a special value add. Some brands, for example, offer cinema screenings of films they think their VIP customers will like as a ‘thank you’ for their loyalty.’

Why? While technological innovation is important, creating added value for customers and meeting their evolving needs over time takes a much broader approach. Brands that also innovate in other ways will reap the rewards.

5. Measuring performance

Finally, if the thought of business as usual is weighing you down, having the appropriate measures in place so you can identify the areas where your business is excelling – and the areas where you could do more – is key. All businesses have certain measures that are essential to their success. Focus on what is important to your business, and ensure these measures extend beyond financial measures. Carefully select your KPIs to ensure your business’ long-term success.

Why? As the saying goes, “what gets measured gets managed”. Setting KPIs will not only encourage your team to continuously improve, but also put in place useful measures for assessing your success and failings.

Need support combatting ‘business as usual’? Contact 0428 593 400 or email enquiries@kiikstart.com.

Are you considering attending or exhibiting at an expo next year? Last week, we explored why most people don’t fully utilise their expo experiences. And, how human connections are the secret ingredient to a successful expo.

Let’s go through how to develop a cohesive experience.

Outline a theme & know who you’re targeting. 

You need to be able to define a key theme and angle to focus on and communicate. Make sure you know the story you want to tell about the business and how it operates, as well as the brand personality.

Know your target, too. Have a criteria for determining the best market fit. What does this look like? Are you targeting by industry, business purpose, businesses of a certain size or certain customer types?

Define how you want to interact with key target markets. What experience and takeaway information do you want to give them? For the expo offer make sure it conveys your vision and what they can expect from the expo.

Follow up is key. 

This is the part of the expo experience that people don’t consider. That is, what happens post-expo. The way you communicate with your guests after the expo is critical. Remember, it’s not about quantity but quality. Get yourself in the mindset of generating relationships, not numbers. Judge the success of your expo appearance on the deepness of the relationships you start and foster.

Have a clear, step-by-step process for getting in touch well before attending. Be clear about your intentions not just for the expo, but after it. Do the things that other exhibitors don’t.

Send a personalised letter that genuinely thanks the people you meet that you identify as the ideal connections. Recap on what you discussed and key points relating to their ‘pain’, plus reiterate what was of core interest. Tell them what you’d like to do for them. Be clear on the next steps and have a key action to call them in a week to put plans into action. Get their feedback and opinion on what you’ve discussed. Most businesses stop once the expo is over. Don’t let this be you.

At Kiikstart, we’re dedicated to helping people create more choice, influence and control about how they do business in modern times. If you’d like to hear more about what we do and the benefits for our clients, contact us today on 0428 593 400 or email enquiries@kiikstart.com.

When was the last time you attended an expo? Maybe you even had a site at one. Whether you were a visitor or exhibitor, did you maximise the opportunity? If you didn’t, this article is for you.

First, it’s important to get clear on why you’re part of the expo. Know what outcomes you’d like to achieve and the response you’d like to give people interacting with you. Outline the content and messages that need to be created to generate these connections. In the greater scheme of your branding, how will the expo help achieve your business vision?

See, preparation is the key of any successful expo. Most businesses forget this part.

What do people want? 

Times are changing. This, we know. But what does this mean for businesses presenting at expos? Let’s look at a few of the key factors that determine engagement with you and your site.

  • The quality of your people, branding, marketing and products or services
  • How interesting but authentic your story is
  • Offering choice in product or service (two or three options)
  • Whether you can inspire and surprise people
  • The manner in which you express value – without being ‘cheap’
  • The level of co-creation and buy in people have with you while interacting
  • Storytelling of your brand, verbally & visually
  • Hands-on interactivity with the product or service
  • Your ability to educate and challenge perceptions with confidence and conviction.

It all comes back to that human connection we always talk about. Expos are a rare opportunity to connect face-to-face with your current and potential customers. How do you want them to feel as a result of interacting with you? What will it require from your business to be able to create this response?

Next week, we’re going to focus on developing a cohesive expo experience. The most important factor to consider is who you’re targeting. Sit with this for a week or two, until the next article. We’ll also cover the importance of following up, post-expo.

And don’t forget to check out our recent four-part series on how to modernise your mainstreet. Even if you don’t operate a business on a mainstreet, you can still learn and benefit from the concepts we explore.

At Kiikstart, we’re dedicated to helping people create more choice, influence and control about how they live, work and learn. If you’d like to hear more about what we do and the benefits for our clients, contact us today on 0428 593 400 or email enquiries@kiikstart.com.

In the last two articles, we’ve explored how modern mainstreets need to innovate and go beyond the expected. But exactly how can towns do this?

Your mainstreet needs to become a destination of experiences, not just a place for visitors to consume ‘stuff.’ Offerings will be developed faster, with ongoing change among traders. Think of it like a constant start-up phase that celebrates newness. 

Consumers care where they spend their money so, regional uniqueness will be the point of difference – with hands on interactions.

Innovation in action. 

When we talk about innovation, we don’t necessarily mean a new, industry-shaking invention. It can be as simple as offering more choice in terms of the hours you open and products you offer. Like 24/7 ‘swipe-in’ gyms! Innovation and creativity can relate to processes, too. Explore different ways to deliver the service experience.

Consider how your staff connects with your guests. Do you offer samples to create a sense of involvement? Is it possible for guests to make their own product?

Think about product ingredients or equipment to keep ahead of the crowd. Strike a balance between connecting online and in person via traditional means.

What’s your level of follow up like? How can you keep people up to date with your product or service delivery? Can you make them excited to visit before even arriving? And, how can you give them a guarantee so they feel comfortable buying from you?

Innovation can be responding to skills gaps in a way that others have not. What are those little extra bits of love that other brands don’t offer? This is innovation.

The leaders of main streets in the future will challenge the commonly held perceptions of what it means to be part of this space. While this will not be necessarily comfortable for the status quo, it will be vital for the ongoing relevance of the main street space and attracting the next generation of thinkers.

An entrepreneurial mindset will create great places to be. Not just great places to shop. There is a key difference between the two. The businesses and brains that excel in a competitive environment will work with purpose and create a distinctly different environment in which to be part of.

At Kiikstart, we’re dedicated to helping people create more choice, influence and control about how they live, work and learn. If you’d like to hear more about what we do and the benefits for our clients contact us today on 0428 593 400 or email enquiries@kiikstart.com.

Modern mainstreets need to go beyond what’s a ‘normal’ retail strip, becoming destinations of experience. They need to offer more than just selling ‘things’, with offerings that constantly change. A ‘constant start-up’ strategy is required.

It’s more about the experience and less about the shops. Where place and people are just as important as quality and communities benefit more than just individual businesses. These areas celebrate the authentic, bespoke and personalised experiences.

Storytelling connects visitors with local identities and creatives working side-by-side. That’s when mainstreet ‘legends’ come to life. Everything is hands-on and nothing is observed or experienced from a distance.

Let’s talk emotions. 

For businesses and traders, it’s important to consider how you want your visitors to react, think or feel. They want to feel important and valued, part of a unique group, remembered, accepted, educated and inspired, and part of something bigger – a community.

Once you know the answers to these questions, you can help create these emotions. This helps consumers care more about where and how they spend their money, as there’s greater soul and personality in the brand offerings.

Experiences become intimate and there’s a sense of rarity and scarcity among traders. Artisan products will take over mass-produced.

Tactical partnerships. 

Modern mainstreets unify traders. And tactical partnerships allow two parties to create product and service offerings that don’t currently exist. Businesses work together to identify key gaps and continue to de-construct and re-build experiences on an ongoing basis. It never stops.

People visit more regularly because they experience something they can’t find anywhere else. As a result, partners access new markets that may not be possible if working alone.

As you start thinking about evolving your own mainstreet, first consider these potential roadblocks:

  • Attitude of unhealthy competition amongst traders and unwillingness to explore partnerships
  • Unwillingness to invest in infrastructure, product and people capability
  • Believing your own hype and resting on what has worked even last year or the year before for your business or mainstreet
  • Not understanding the real desires and hot buttons for your most ideal customers
  • Not knowing who your ideal customers are
  • Inability to define brand personality and how this can be leveraged to shape modern environments, people and product offerings
  • Inability to showcase new and emerging offerings. Sticking with tried and true.

Next up, we’ll be covering what a dynamic, ever-evolving mainstreet looks like.

The modern mainstreet is more than just shopping, now. It’s about creating a mini destination.

At Kiikstart, we’re dedicated to helping people have more choice, influence and control about how they live, work and learn. If you’d like to hear more about what we do and the benefits for our clients contact us today on 0428 593 400 or email enquiries@kiikstart.com.

We talk about the value of applying an entrepreneurial mindset, no matter what stage (or type) of business you’re in. The same goes for the modern mainstreet.

Mainstreets are an interesting place. Often, they’re located in regional areas, featuring a collective mix of businesses. Kiikstart is launching a series to help mainstreets modernise their offerings and remain thriving hubs for towns, attracting both locals and tourists.

In this article, we’ll introduce you to a few of the important takeaways to warm you up.

Mainstreets need to innovate, too. 

Innovation in a modern mainstreet environment is about becoming a distinctive place that’s a destination in itself. Diversity is the key, especially beyond just food and wine. You need to listen to what your visitors are telling you.

This is what Barossa Visitor Information Centre did. They’ve created experiences relevant to the region, giving thought to what’s curated within the space. People get to choose their own adventure, a rarity in tourism offerings. There’s greater choice in events and retail, using both verbal and non-verbal storytelling to connect with guests.

The region celebrates co-location and co-creation within the VIC – through the cycle hub (that allows people to secure their bikes, pump up their tyres and buy accessories), the library, outdoor meeting space with games and chill-out areas, and a dedicated spot for events, markets & licensed bars. This multi-purpose approach with a commercial spin is what’s leading to its success as a region.

The product mix has evolved. There’s a product shift to hand-making modern, contemporary experiences with residents, visiting family and friends and guests.

Bring local producers together in a way that doesn’t currently happen, so new experiences are created. What are other businesses doing? Avoid overlapping offerings. Don’t be afraid to think about how you can generate revenue. The regional brand values should always be in the back of your mind, as the bigger picture.

Final takeaways. 

Modern mainstreets are real destinations, not just another retail precinct. Work to become authentic and grounded in the regions uniqueness. Get hands-on in your product and service interactions, instead of having people observe from a distance.

Before our next article, think about these points:

  • Continuously challenge and review what you do, how and why
  • Always adopt a client-centric approach
  • Be brave and courageous in your business decisions
  • Ensure internal and external environments are user friendly and accessible
  • Never rest on your laurels – work hard to create an incentive to return repeatedly.

At Kiikstart, we’re dedicated to helping people have more choice, influence and control about how they live, work and learn. If you’d like to hear more about what we do and the benefits for our clients contact us today on 0428 593 400 or email enquiries@kiikstart.com.

We’ve all done this. Stood in an aisle, with hundreds of choices staring at us, only to make a choice based on packaging alone. For wine, it’s the label that we see first. For producers, this is why the branding is so important. It has to tell your wine’s story, in a matter of seconds.

At Kiikstart, we talk a lot about the story. The verbal and non-verbal cues. The way your customers (and potential customers) perceive you.

Think of your label as an advertisement for what’s inside the bottle. You’ve got to spend time finding out what your current label really says to your customers. And more importantly, what do you want it to say? This will guide your design choices.

Wine packaging gives cues to buyers about what to expect inside. The bottle shape, colour, how it’s sealed and the label all serve as ‘chapters’ in the story. Does your label illustrate homemade wine or a corporation? Will it be for millennials or baby boomers? Is it fruity or heavy? For a special occasion or an afternoon BBQ?

Know what you want to say about the wine in the bottle. Once you’ve got your main message, you’ll have a basis for designing the personality of your bottle. By focusing on a deliberate visual message, you’ll be amazed at what the right label can do for your wine.

Have fun with it and push the envelope. Put yourself in your customers’ shoes – someone who knows nothing about your wine. How can you use imagery to get them to purchase it? What would stop you in the aisle?

Consider how your label fits in with the rest of your brand experiences. Will they get the same feeling walking into your winery for tastings? What about your website or social media – does it have a similar vibe? While your label might only seem like a small part of your overall communications, it plays an important role. It’s the first thing people will see.

Aim to appeal to a problem you’re trying to solve. There are five basic stages which a customer usually goes through when buying a product.

They are:

  1. Need recognition
  2. Information search
  3. Evaluation of alternatives
  4. Purchase
  5. Post-purchase evaluation

Your label will help you standout when they’re evaluating alternatives, but the rest of the steps can’t be forgotten either.

At Kiikstart, we’re dedicated to helping people have more choice, influence and control about how they live, work and learn. If you’d like to hear more about what we do and the benefits for our clients contact us today on 0428 593 400 or email enquiries@kiikstart.com.