Tag: business culture

When did you last review your end-to-end operations and really assess how generous you are as a business? Likely never.

Generosity is an essential factor that determines the type of attachment people have to your business – and whether they’ll feel a sense of connection with you both now and into the future. It relates to not only your external relationships with clients, but equally to the relationships you are creating with your staff. Generosity begins at home, or in this case, in the business.

Today I’ve covered some of the ways you can demonstrate this culture of generosity – and why it makes good business sense to do so.

Caring for your team
You’ve no doubt heard the saying “charity begins at home”. The same applies to your business. Ask yourself: When was the last time I sat down with key members of my team and assessed how generous we are with our staff? You probably haven’t, after all you pay them, so what more do they want? As disturbing as this outdated thinking is, there are plenty of organisations that take this view to their detriment. As American leadership author Jon Gordon says, “Great leaders don’t succeed because they are great. They succeed because they bring out the greatness in others.” The same can be said of companies.

It’s likely that one of your business’ values is care for your customers. This care also must extend to your team. As marketing strategist Leo J. Bogee III advises, “Give value, give opportunities, give satisfaction, give praise, give encouragement, give joy. You’ll be shocked at the bounty that returns.” Check out my recent post on improving staff buy-in for examples of ways to show you care about your team.

The value of giving back
While caring for your team will yield happier, harder working employees, it is giving back to your customers that will generate sales and create loyal customers. Whether it’s a simple handwritten thank you note, a birthday voucher thanking your customer for their patronage, an invitation allowing them to sample a product with no strings attached, or something more elaborate, ensuring your customer feels valued is key.

According to Gartner Inc., in only a few years 89 per cent of businesses will compete first and foremost on their service delivery and customer service experience. This means that, increasingly, generosity needs to become a focus. The cardinal rule? Your generosity should always add value to your client’s experience.

Social responsibility
We know that customers are increasingly turning to companies that are good global citizens.  This is particularly true of younger generations. As Jiffy Junk LCC Managing Member Adam Butler asserts, “As businesses work hard to establish a brand identity, social responsibility and charitable support need to factor into who we say we are.”

When giving back as a company, factor your customers into your decision making. Engage your clients in a conversation to identify what social responsibility means to them, and who and what causes you should be giving to. Remember, it is never about you! Matching funds giving – where businesses match individuals’ donations – is one successful strategy that promotes giving among consumers, and highlights a culture of businesses giving back.

The power of generosity
A culture of generosity through giving back to the community and consumers can help to set your business apart, and also demonstrates the power of gratitude. One guiding rule? Ensure that what you are giving is appropriate and fits with your brand. For example, if you are a premium brand, value-adds and gifts should reflect this.

Some companies foster a culture of giving through subsidised volunteer hours for their employees. Nonprofits Source found that in the United States 60 per cent of the companies they surveyed offered paid time off for employees who volunteered with non-profits. They also found that employees who volunteered during work hours also felt a greater sense of loyalty to their employer, and developed leadership skills in the process.

Setting yourself apart
I recently wrote about my time working at The Body Shop, and the lessons I learnt from Dame Anita Roddick. The company fostered a culture of care and giving that hasn’t really been replicated on this scale since. However this culture of care and activism was a significant driver for many consumers that really set the brand apart.

Depending on your brand and clients, this culture of generosity can be represented in a variety of ways. It could be through extra product, value-adds such as free workshops, or the opportunity to try a limited release product before it launches to the market. It could be flexibility in how you deliver a service, or an invitation to a special networking event. You don’t need to spend a lot of money; what you give just needs to be seen as useful to your client.

Remember that the relationships we have with our staff and clients are like our personal relationships. If they are not nurtured and prioritised, people tend to look elsewhere. Good, loyal customers can be hard to find, so make generosity a priority for you in 2019 and beyond. Happy giving!

Promoting from within is a great motivational tool for your team – and a fantastic way to retain your best people.

But, when taken too far, it can create a culture that is insular and nepotistic.

Striking the right balance between promoting from within and bringing in outside talent with fresh ideas is key to any business’ success.

Here, I’ve covered my top five reasons why looking beyond your in-house talent pool can add value, whether you’re looking at a new hire, or working with expert contractors on a regular basis.

Fresh perspective
External hires and contractors, such as trainers and business coaches, can bring fresh ideas and perspective. Likewise, hiring leaders outside your business can have many benefits. University of Missouri-Columbia research found that while 78 per cent of new CEOs are hired from within an organisation, external hires “spend more money on research and development” and showcase a greater commitment to innovation. This is particularly important where a business is struggling or in need of rejuvenation. Let’s be honest – regular, constant rejuvenation is a reality for any business that wants to be relevant and grow into the future.

Multi-industry expertise
When sourcing outsider talent, choose experts with experience across multiple industries. The scope of their expertise is a major value-add. In fact, outsiders with expertise far-removed from your industry can offer more value still, since like for like expertise often does not allow for new idea generation.

Challenging the status quo
Outsiders bring new insights – and can challenge group thinking that can come from knowing each other too well and feeling too comfortable. When done right, outsiders will challenge the status quo, including relationships and team behaviours that inhibit growth and innovation.

This is particularly true of business coaches. The right business coach will immerse themselves in your business to gain a full picture. This might include interviewing staff and observing your business in operation. Working with outside experts also brings a level of accountability that can see ideas be executed rather than merely spoken. This minimises waste and, in turn, can increase morale and staff buy-in.

Cost-effective support
In addition to their expertise, working with contractors is a cost-effective approach for many businesses. In-house help in areas such as business coaching, finance or marketing may be cost-prohibitive to many small to medium businesses. At the same time, uneven workflows may make working with outsider talent a more attractive approach.

Cultural shake-up
Outsiders – and hiring outside leadership – can also be useful when a business is in need of a cultural shake-up.  One prime example is the banking sector, with the big four currently under intense scrutiny as a result of the royal commission that is underway. Hiring outside leaders to overcome a culture of mistrust is one effective way to signal a new beginning in the eyes of the public.

So whether you’re after a fresh perspective, in need of a multi-disciplinary expert to bring external expertise and challenge the status quo, or it’s time to reset and refresh your business, outsider talent can add huge value to your organisation that should not be overlooked when it comes to your hiring practices and contract work.

People often talk about “organisational culture” like it’s a silver bullet. Get the culture right in a workplace and, before you know it, you’ll be breaking sales records and winning awards, right?

Wrong.

Many organisations are investing huge money and effort into getting their company culture just right.

It’s a fantastic objective, but one that’s potentially flawed when organisational culture is viewed as a homogenous mass.

So here are a few insider tips to consider when looking at your organisation’s culture. Take these tips into account and you’ll ensure you get value from your review.

Tip 1: Organisations aren’t limited to one culture

This is a common misconception, but there are many cultural aspects that create both your clients’ and staff’s reality. Often, numerous organisational cultures are competing for attention. While your culture relates to your team and staff processes, it’s also expressed through customer experience.  Motivational speaker Simon Sinek cites Starbucks as an example, saying “Starbucks was founded around the experience and the environment of their stores.” He says the brand created a comfortable space for people to come and work without pressure to buy. “The coffee was incidental,” he continues.

Takeaway: Remember that while culture is often seen as relating to your internal team, how you’re perceived in the marketplace by your customers, as well as the wider community, is another measure of your organisational culture.

Tip 2: A culture of loyalty can be damaging

I want to debunk a long-held view that staff loyalty is always essential to a positive organisational culture. I’ve worked with dozens of companies and organisations who have proven that loyalty – often viewed based on length of service – can be counterproductive. At times employees can become so “loyal” to an employer that they don’t make their own future and wellbeing a priority, with disastrous consequences. Loyal employees can feel disengaged if they’re overlooked for promotions, while employers might conversely place too high of a regard on loyalty, rather than finding the best person for a particular role. Loyal employees can stop employers from making the hard decisions they need to. At the same time, employees might miss out on the opportunities they want, resulting in a lose-lose.

Takeaway: Modern businesses need to create a culture that places respect for each other and our clients, hard work and genuine output ahead of loyalty.

Tip 3: Review your culture – regularly

Think you’ve already got a great organisational culture? It’s still important to review your cultures, as your internal culture influences how your customers perceive you and your organisation, and impacts on the quality of your service delivery. This, in turn, will impact your KPIs and the overall performance of your organisation. Steve Jobs once famously stated that the real return on culture at Apple “happened when we started getting more deliberate about it”. He said this was done “By writing it down. By debating it. By taking it apart, polishing the pieces and putting it back together.”

Takeaway: Your organisation’s cultures are always a work in progress, open to review, change and growth.

Need support reviewing your organisational cultures? Kiikstart can help. Get in touch at enquiries@kiikstart.com or phone 0428 593 400.