Tag: Google

Across the world, minimising waste is a hot topic. The decluttering movement is gaining ground, and the world is waking up to the environmental implications of our waste.

In business, there are many examples of waste– and all of them can impact on our bottom line and our psyche.

While many businesses are good at minimising physical waste, business and staff inefficiencies can have an even greater impact on your bottom line.

Here are six ways to minimise waste at work with the potential to whip your business into shape in no time flat (with a little hard work, that is).

Clear communication
Despite more methods of communication than ever before, this doesn’t prevent some messages from getting lost in translation. When communication breaks down, this can have a serious impact on your business, impacting staff morale, your team’s output, and ultimately your customers. There are many ways to improve your team’s communication. Choosing select mediums for communication is one important way. For example, consider platforms such as Slack to streamline your workflows, and minimise the number of emails you send and receive.

Avoid over-servicing
Under-servicing can lead to dissatisfied customers, but over-servicing can be just as costly. While it’s great to be accessible to your clients, remember that this comes at a cost to your business. TopLine Comms CEO Heather Baker says over-servicing is the number one profitability killer for service businesses. “We created a level of expectation that simply wasn’t feasible,” she says of her own experience. Utilise a time tracking system, such as Toggl or Clockify, to identify areas where you are over-servicing, and pass this information on to your clients to take back control.

Flexible roles
Having defined roles, especially as your business grows, is essential to avoid the duplication of services. But Professor of Organisational Behaviour at London Business School, Dan Cable, says job titles must be flexible and play to each employee’s strengths. “Nowadays organisations need innovation and agility from employees,” he says. “This opens the door for employees to use their personal skills to adapt the job, and the job title, around their strengths.” Strike a balance by continuing to set KPIs, but taking a less rigid approach to the job descriptions of old.

A matter of priorities
Time management expert Peter Turla says, “Managing your time without setting priorities is like shooting randomly and calling whatever you hit the target.” It can be the difference between success and mediocrity. Your business needs to clearly define what high value work is for your brand, and ensure your leaders are setting clearly parameters and direction around this. Consider how you’re using your time and talents, and be strategic when prioritising your tasks to minimise waste.

Act on ideas
A company culture that promotes not only idea generation, but also idea execution, is crucial. Without the latter, your team’s talents and ideas are wasted. While experimentation is not without risks of its own, chief innovation officer of Rightpoint Greg Raiz says embracing risk must become part of a company’s “long-term culture” if it is to remain innovative. “The overnight disruptive success of the iPhone, Google, Amazon and Netflix all took more than a decade,” he says. Failure to leverage new ideas and networks in real time can create a culture of living in the past and doing what is safe, to the detriment of your brand.

Plan your events
While there is a strong push for more investment in professional development and marketing opportunities within many companies, it is important that these opportunities do not result in financial waste. When considering expos, tradeshows, workshops and other profile-raising and professional development options, consider what you or your employees will take out of this. Ensure that you clearly define and plan out how you will leverage your attendance in the real world. Where you can’t define these benefits, such opportunities are best avoided.

Minimising any business’ waste in a meaningful and holistic way requires work, but consider the far greater cost of not doing this work. This work should begin with a review of your business in order to identify the greatest areas of waste. Nevertheless, small changes count. Ask yourself: What is one small change I can make to my company’s operations to minimise our waste? Then, make the switch. Take the small wins, and plan for a bigger overhaul that incorporates all of these steps.

Words are powerful.

Just ask any leader or media personality who has stumbled over their words, or used the wrong word in a situation. (Who could forget Tony Abbott’s ‘suppository of all wisdom’ gaffe!).

When it comes to brands, telling a compelling story is critical.

But while it may be easy to sell yourself through words (you can always rely on the services of expert marketers for that!)  it can be harder to walk that talk.

Here are five non-verbal ways to tell your brand’s story.

Captivating Visuals
Getting your visual branding and assets right can have a major impact on your brand. It’s why 91% of consumers prefer visual content to text – and why so many brands embark on major rebrands. Your visual content extends to your social media, where some brands triumph. Whole Foods, for example, reflects its brand values through eye-catching imagery on Instagram that reflect the brand’s wholesome food offering.

Design & Layout
Whether it’s a retail or office environment, the design and layout of your brand’s physical space is a fantastic visual portrayal of your values. Silicon Valley brands like Google and Facebook showcase their innovation and commitment to staff satisfaction through their thoughtful office environments, while Etsy’s quirky Brooklyn headquarters reflect the brand’s focus on high-quality crafting.

Evoke the Senses
When designing your brand’s space, consider how stimulating the senses can add to the mood or story of your brand. I recently wrote about how The Body Shop created an innovative retail space, which fed into the company’s broader story. Likewise, Abercrombie & Fitch plays on the senses to attract their target market, spraying fragrance and playing loud music to draw in their target clientele.

Poignant Packaging
A brand’s packaging is an important extension of their visual identity. Tiffany & Co. is one of the best examples of this. Those teal bags and boxes and white ribbon have long been synonymous with the brand, and speak to their values of timeless beauty and luxury. Brands can also reflect other values, such as their commitment to the environment, through their packaging. Organic haircare brand Kevin Murphy, for example, recently made a commitment to move to bottles made from 100 per cent recycled ocean plastics, which speaks to the brand’s commitment to the environment.

Customer Service
Finally, customer service is a clear representation of your brand’s values. As Alexandra Sheehan writes for Shopify, “Sales associates on the floor are the personification of your brand… It’s imperative that they’re considered an essential component of the brand identity.” Costco is one brand that reflects its values through their customer service. The retailer is known for being particularly accommodating when it comes to returns. The company has successfully created an affordable shopping experience without compromising on customer experience.

So there you have it! From your packaging, to visual and sensory experiences, there’s much more to your brand story than words.

Time to walk the talk? At Kiikstart we’re specialists when it comes to business strategy and idea execution. Get in touch today for support with any aspects of your company’s planning or storytelling. Email enquiries@kiikstart.com.