Tag: marketing

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Combining his background in marketing and graphic design with a fast-growing passion for wine, Daniel Hill is on favourable ground at Seabrook Wines in the Barossa Valley. The Tasting Room & Wine Club Specialist, who says he fell into a career in the wine industry, is using his skills to help grow the brand. Daniel’s approach includes exceptional end-to-end customer service that begins when customers enter the cellar door, and extends beyond their visit.

The family-owned Barossa Valley winery is run by Hamish and Jo Seabrook. Hamish is a first generation winemaker, but comes from a family of wine merchants and educators with deep roots in the industry. It’s a rich and unique story – and one Daniel says is worth telling.

We asked Daniel to share more about his background, Seabrook’s approach to telling their story, and how the brand is elevating their customers’ experience.

What’s your role at Seabrook and how long have you been with them?
Technically my role is ‘Tasting Room & Wine Club Specialist’, but my position within the company is multi-faceted so in addition to the day-to-day workings of the tasting room, I manage the website, social, digital and print media, investigate new marketing and sales opportunities, and look after local trade accounts for the Barossa region.

Seabrook Wines’ story is an interesting one. How do you articulate the family’s story about the shift from wine merchants to makers?
There’s definitely a wonderful history behind the brand and why we do what we do. Seabrook is a first generation producer and Hamish is the first winemaker in his family, and the first to be making wines under his own label. However, the wine merchant business dates back to 1878.

Hamish’s dad was the last to run that business, but due to the evolving market he decided to conclude that business in the late 1970s and move to the Barossa.

In your storytelling how much do you focus on this history?
We’re up-front about the fact that we’re a young producer and a new kid on the block despite that history. The brand is still quite unknown to today’s younger market, with a lot of the older generation familiar with the W.J. Seabrook & Sons releases.

How is the wine industry changing?
From my point of view, there’s been a cultural shift in the way people consume alcohol. The focus has shifted to quality over quantity, with more people enjoying better wine, spirits and beers.

How do you set yourself apart in a very busy market?
Our Tasting Room offers gorgeous views from our deck, where guests can take in the surrounds of our estate vineyard. Guests that visit Seabrook are welcomed, and provided with a relaxed, fun, and informative wine discovery experience. We want people to slow down, take in the surrounds, enjoy our products, hear our stories, and be entertained with our company; all in a comfortable and welcoming environment. Making guests feel at home is key to what we do.

The three most important factors to the Seabrook customer experience are the product, the experience, and the service. If any of these falls short of exceptional, we would have failed to create a memorable and life-lasting experience.

How do you elevate customers’ experience at cellar door?
The customer experience begins the moment they walk through our doors. Visitors are welcomed with a warm greeting, a handshake, an introduction to our tasting room, and most importantly a glass of Riesling! From there, we seat the customer like you would in a restaurant; seat them, pour water, ask them questions about themselves and their journey, and explain to them how the experience will run.

Each visitor is treated like family, with the hope that they feel welcomed into our extended family, and begin a lifelong relationship with Seabrook as people and a brand. This doesn’t change after they’ve left our Tasting Room either. Personalised emails, phone calls, and invites to offsite events allow us to strengthen the wonderful relationships that we forge in our Barossa Valley home.

We also continue that personalised service once they’ve left. I usually grab their order form and jot down their names so I make sure that I don’t forget. We place a card with a photo of our winery and a handwritten thank you note into their box; it doesn’t matter if they’ve bought one bottle or 10 bottles. We want our customers to feel appreciated, and that reciprocity and personalisation is key.

Why is it important to go the extra mile for your customers?
I remember when I began visiting cellar doors on a journey to learn more about wine. The overall experience was quite daunting and left me questioning whether wine was for me.

When I sat with Hamish to discuss how we could create a unique and tailored tasting experience here at Seabrook, I needed to ensure it was welcoming, relaxing, and fun overall. I don’t want anyone to walk out of our doors and feel the way I did many years ago.

Wine IS for everyone. It shouldn’t feel pretentious or exclusive, and people shouldn’t feel daunted by it.

Visitors to Seabrook should leave with a lasting and positive impression of their time with us – and then be transported back to that moment every time they open a Seabrook wine.

The idea for thank you cards was conceived by owner Jo Seabrook at one of Kiikstart’s customer experience workshops. To find out about future sessions, or to work with Kiikstart, visit email enquiries@kiikstart.com.

From the Southern Highlands, to the ‘Southern Pie-lands’, the humble pie has spawned a marketing campaign that has seen an estimated $2 million injection for the local New South Wales economy.

As Manager Tourism & Events for Destination Southern Highlands for the past 13 years, Steve Rosa is part of the innovative team behind Pie Time. The June event is a month-long celebration of pies incorporating a Pie Trail of bakeries and other eateries serving pies of all descriptions, as well as cooking classes, pie tours, pie short break stays and more that also features a two-day flagship festival, PieFest.

We chat with Steve about the evolution of the destination marketing campaign – and why it’s been a major tourism drawcard for the region.

How did the concept for Pie Time come about?
Back in October 2016, we were undertaking a product audit of our region and noted that we had a high concentration of local bakeries. Initial numbers were 28 bakeries spread throughout our picturesque region covering 17 towns and villages over 2700sqkms. To complement our existing tourism experience trails such as our Heritage Trail, Garden Trail, Antique Trail, Arts Trail and Wine Trail, we decided to develop a Pie Trail which was accessible all year round. Following the successful launch of the Pie Trail in January 2017, we consulted with industry to create events and experiences around pies to give visitors another reason to experience the Southern Highlands. A two-day Pie Festival was initiated in June 2017, with a number of supporting pie themed events and experiences also created during the winter month of June – the best time to enjoy a pie.

How did your marketing campaign evolve?
This initial concept work led us to bake an original destination marketing campaign, aptly named Pie Time.  The humble pie was used as a platform for marketing the region during the off-peak month of June, encouraging people to visit, explore and stay while immersing themselves in Pie Time, which offers them unique ways to discover the Southern Highlands while indulging in plenty of pies through a pie trail, pie promotions, pie competitions, pie activities and experiences, and a pie festival. It also offered a new way to support and connect local industry by providing businesses with a unique selling point, a tangible way to create new promotions, an increase in customers in a non-peak visitation month, and an opportunity to collaboration with other businesses in the region to offer new customer experiences.

How big was the budget for the campaign and who was involved?
The destination marketing campaign was developed with a small budget of $80,000 plus industry co-op. The campaign celebrates the Southern Highlands as ‘Australia’s Home of Pies’, as no other region in Australia has a Pie Trail, a Pie Festival or more pie outlets in a destination the size of the Southern Highlands.

What were some of the key ingredients of the campaign?
The campaign ingredients included over 50 local pie sites including bakeries, cafes, restaurants, cellar doors, pubs, hotels, pie makers, tour operators, tourist attractions, event organisers, local Council and community groups. The recipe was a range of pie-themed events, a pie trail, pie related activities and experiences, a festival, and places to stay over the month of June. It involved taking existing products and attractions, encouraging and supporting the creation of new events, and combining them to create a short break campaign and richer destination product with a more compelling call to action under the Pie Time brand.

Have you been surprised by the take-up of this event? (And the doubling in pie sales in only one year?)
Yes! The humble pie resonates with people at all levels. It’s often at the centre of family memories, and there’s a pie for everyone, from plain to signature pies, vegetarian and vegan. It’s unique, quirky and fun. It’s a different approach to destination marketing. To see 100,000 pies produced and sold in June 2017, and see that increase by 100% to 200,000 pies in June 2018 is astonishing.

What sets this event apart from other food festivals?
It’s totally different to anything available elsewhere in Australia. The campaign and event supports our region’s position as a boutique Food & Wine destination and complements the development of our foodie experiences & trails. The campaign also targets both visitors and the local community through targeted and customised events and experiences.

How did you leverage the local community to support the event?
The Pie Time campaign was well communicated to local residents via local media, Council & DSH communications. Communications aimed to engage the local community as advocates for Pie Time among their family and friends. We developed special promotions and events for the local community such as ‘Local Pie Night’, where locals were incentivised to invite visiting family and friends to the Highlands on the last weekend of Pie Time in June to share a pie and the region. We also partnered with local charity group Meals on Wheels to conduct the ‘Giant Pie Drive’ throughout June, where schools, sporting organisations, groups, businesses and clubs could purchase pies as a fundraiser.

How did you drive this campaign on a shoe-string budget?
Working with a minimal budget required lots of creativity – particularly in advertising. Pie Time needed to stand on its own as worthy of PR placement, to ensure free coverage that could reach the geographically diverse audience we could not afford through traditional avenues of paid advertising. Our own paid advertising efforts through “non-traditional” avenues also needed to be extremely targeted – ensuring sufficient capture of our target demographic across Sydney, Canberra and Wollongong, without blowing the budget.

The Pie Time marketing strategy for 2018 was to capitalise on the momentum that had been achieved in year one, while cementing that Pie Time is here to stay and the Southern Highlands does, in fact, become the Southern ‘Pielands’ in June! A Pie Time communications strategy was developed that included a multi-channel approach with a heavy and target digital presence supported with free publicity and promotions. In addition to paid media and PR, we worked collaboratively with Tourism Australia, DNSW, Visit Canberra and local industry to further extend the campaign’s exposure.

What lessons can you take out of this campaign?
Always look to generate good content for stories and visual uptake by media. And ensure that you bring the industry on board, so they can take ownership of the campaign, in part by providing cost effective opportunities for industry to take part.

It’s a fantastic event concept. Why is it important to think outside the square when it comes to tourism campaigns?
Destination marketing is a very competitive and noisy market space. You need to continually find destination USPs to set your destination apart from others and give people – including repeat visitors – a reason to visit or come back.

Promoting from within is a great motivational tool for your team – and a fantastic way to retain your best people.

But, when taken too far, it can create a culture that is insular and nepotistic.

Striking the right balance between promoting from within and bringing in outside talent with fresh ideas is key to any business’ success.

Here, I’ve covered my top five reasons why looking beyond your in-house talent pool can add value, whether you’re looking at a new hire, or working with expert contractors on a regular basis.

Fresh perspective
External hires and contractors, such as trainers and business coaches, can bring fresh ideas and perspective. Likewise, hiring leaders outside your business can have many benefits. University of Missouri-Columbia research found that while 78 per cent of new CEOs are hired from within an organisation, external hires “spend more money on research and development” and showcase a greater commitment to innovation. This is particularly important where a business is struggling or in need of rejuvenation. Let’s be honest – regular, constant rejuvenation is a reality for any business that wants to be relevant and grow into the future.

Multi-industry expertise
When sourcing outsider talent, choose experts with experience across multiple industries. The scope of their expertise is a major value-add. In fact, outsiders with expertise far-removed from your industry can offer more value still, since like for like expertise often does not allow for new idea generation.

Challenging the status quo
Outsiders bring new insights – and can challenge group thinking that can come from knowing each other too well and feeling too comfortable. When done right, outsiders will challenge the status quo, including relationships and team behaviours that inhibit growth and innovation.

This is particularly true of business coaches. The right business coach will immerse themselves in your business to gain a full picture. This might include interviewing staff and observing your business in operation. Working with outside experts also brings a level of accountability that can see ideas be executed rather than merely spoken. This minimises waste and, in turn, can increase morale and staff buy-in.

Cost-effective support
In addition to their expertise, working with contractors is a cost-effective approach for many businesses. In-house help in areas such as business coaching, finance or marketing may be cost-prohibitive to many small to medium businesses. At the same time, uneven workflows may make working with outsider talent a more attractive approach.

Cultural shake-up
Outsiders – and hiring outside leadership – can also be useful when a business is in need of a cultural shake-up.  One prime example is the banking sector, with the big four currently under intense scrutiny as a result of the royal commission that is underway. Hiring outside leaders to overcome a culture of mistrust is one effective way to signal a new beginning in the eyes of the public.

So whether you’re after a fresh perspective, in need of a multi-disciplinary expert to bring external expertise and challenge the status quo, or it’s time to reset and refresh your business, outsider talent can add huge value to your organisation that should not be overlooked when it comes to your hiring practices and contract work.